United Nations: Ratification of 18 International Human Rights Treaties

What is the most ratified human rights treaty? Which one did your country ratify? Find out using our NEW interactive dashboard on the status of ratification of International Human Rights Treaties: http://indicators.ohchr.org/Ratifications
Now lets take a closer look at just how much “value” Canada and the Harpercons have in Human Rights, according to the United Nations list of Ratified Human Rights Treaties, let it be known Canada doesn’t fair so well, all States need to take another look, try the second time around, looking with your “Heart” click here or the link above and see which ones your country Ratified.

I am including a list of the 5 out of 18 International Human Rights Treaties that Canada has currently Ratified and or Signed:

  1. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: 1976, Signature: NA, Ratification/Accession 1976
    • 29 October 1979
      “The Government of Canada declares, under article 41 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, that it recognizes the competence of the Human Rights Committee referred to in article 28 of the said Covenant to receive and consider communications submitted by another State Party, provided that such State Party has, not less than twelve months prior to the submission by it of a communication relating to Canada, made a declaration under article 41 recognizing the competence of the Committee to receive and consider communications relating to itself.”
  2. Convention against Torture and other Cruel Inhuman or Degrading treatment or Punishment: 1987 Signature: 1985, Ratification/Accession: 1987
    • 13 November 1989
      “The Government of Canada declares that it recognizes the competence of the Committee Against Torture, pursuant to article 21 of the said Convention, to receive and consider communications to the effect that a state party claims that another state party is not fulfilling its obligations under this Convention.
      “The Government of Canada also declares that it recognizes the competence of the Committee Against Torture, pursuant to article 22 of the said Convention, to receive and consider communications from or on behalf of individuals subject to its jurisdiction who claim to be victims of a violation by a state party of the provisions of the Convention.”
  3. Convention on the Rights of The Child: Signature: 1990, Ratification/Accession: 1991
    • Reservations:
      “(i) Article 21 With a view to ensuring full respect for the purposes and intent of article 20 (3) and article 30 of the Convention, the Government of Canada reserves the right not to apply the provisions of article 21 to the extent that they may be inconsistent with customary forms of care among aboriginal peoples in Canada. “(ii) Article 37 (c) The Government of Canada accepts the general principles of article 37 (c) of the Convention, but reserves the right not to detain children separately from adults where this is not appropriate or feasible. Statement of understanding: “Article 30 It is the understanding of the Government of Canada that, in matters relating to aboriginal peoples of Canada, the fulfilment of its responsibilities under article 4 of the Convention must take into account the provisions of article 30. In particular, in assessing what measures are appropriate to implement the rights recognized in the Convention for aboriginal children, due regard must be paid to not denying their right, in community with other members of their group, to enjoy their own culture, to profess and practice their own religion and to use their own language.”
  4. Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of Children in Armed conflict: 2002 Signature: 2000, Ratification/Accession 2000
    • Declaration:
      “Pursuant to article 3, paragraph 2, of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on Involvement of Children in Armed Conflicts, Canada hereby declares: 1. The Canadian Armed Forces permit voluntary recruitment at the minimum age of 16 years. 2. The Canadian Armed Forces have adopted the following safeguards to ensure that recruitment of personnel under the age of 18 years is not forced or coerced: (a) all recruitment of personnel in the Canadian Forces is voluntary. Canada does not practice conscription or any form of forced or obligatory service. In this regard, recruitment campaigns of the Canadian Forces are informational in nature. If an individual wishes to enter the Canadian Forces, he or she fills in an application. If the Canadian Forces offer a particular position to the candidate, the latter is not obliged to accept the position; (b ) recruitment of personnel under the age of 18 is done with the informed and written consent of the person’s parents or legal guardians. Article 20, paragraph 3, of the National Defence Act states that ‘a person under the age of eighteen years shall not be enrolled without the consent of one of the parents or the guardian of that person’, (c) personnel under the age of 18 are fully informed of the duties involved in military service. The Canadian Forces provide, among other things, a series of informational brochures and films on the duties involved in military service to those who wish to enter the Canadian Forces; and (d) personnel under the age of 18 must provide reliable proof of age prior to acceptance into national military service. An applicant must provide a legally recognized document, that is an original or a certified copy of their birth certificate or baptismal certificate, to prove his or her age.”
  5. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: 2000 Signature: 2007, Ratification/Accession: 2010
    • Declaration and reservation:
      “Canada recognises that persons with disabilities are presumed to have legal capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of their lives. Canada declares its understanding that Article 12 permits supported and substitute decision-making arrangements in appropriate circumstances and in accordance with the law. To the extent Article 12 may be interpreted as requiring the elimination of all substitute decision-making arrangements, Canada reserves the right to continue their use in appropriate circumstances and subject to appropriate and effective safeguards. With respect to Article 12 (4), Canada reserves the right not to subject all such measures to regular review by an independent authority, where such measures are already subject to review or appeal. Canada interprets Article 33 (2) as accommodating the situation of federal states where the implementation of the Convention will occur at more than one level of government and through a variety of mechanisms, including existing ones.”

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One thought on “United Nations: Ratification of 18 International Human Rights Treaties

  1. First and foremost I only have complete and sincere Trust, Dignity, Honor and Respect in one organization because they support Human Rights, Ethics, Equality, and Equal Rights for all Humanity, The United Nations Human Rights Organization.

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