🇨🇦 The Everett Klippert Story

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“Canadians know our country is made stronger because of our diversity, not in spite of it.”

Mr. Trudeau decided to recommend the pardon and order the review after The Globe and Mail raised Mr. Klippert’s case with the government this week, as part of its investigation into circumstances surrounding Mr. Klippert’s conviction. “Everett Klippert’s case was instrumental in the government’s decision to decriminalize homosexual acts between consenting adults,” Cameron Ahmad, press secretary to the Prime Minister, said in a statement.

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klippert5bEverett George Klippert, who was born in 1926, was convicted of 18 counts of gross indecency by a Calgary court in 1960, and spent four years in prison after pleading guilty to having consensual sex short of intercourse with other men. (Intercourse, or “buggery,” was a separate offence.) After a second conviction in 1965 in Hay River, NWT, on four additional counts of gross indecency, and a sentence of a further three years, the Crown attorney in Yellowknife applied to have him designated a dangerous sexual offender.

Two psychiatrists who examined Mr. Klippert said that he was not a pedophile or in any way inclined to violence – they found him “intelligent,” “courteous” and “sensitive” – but concluded he was likely to once again seek out sex with men upon his release. For that reason, Justice John Sissons went ahead and designated Mr. Klippert a dangerous sexual offender, subject to life imprison– ment.

The Supreme Court of Canada upheld the designation in a 3-to-2 ruling in 1967, causing a furor in Parliament and the press. A month later, then-justice minister Pierre Trudeau introduced legislation that, among other provisions, decriminalized consensual homosexual acts between two adult men.

“There’s no place for the state in the bedrooms of the nation,” he told reporters, echoing a Globe and Mail editorial of the week before.

cdfb214e-87f3-49a9-bd99-4eb1d324fcaeA similar bill became law in 1969, when Mr. Trudeau was prime minister. But for reasons that remain unclear, Mr. Klippert was not released on parole until 1971, having spent a total of 10 years in prison.

The government’s statement this week said: “As Canadians, we know that protecting and promoting fundamental human rights must be an imperative for governments and individuals alike – and this includes gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation. We have made great strides in securing legal rights for the LGBTQ2 [lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, transsexual, queer, and two-spirited] community in Canada … but the fight chuckie officersmilie policeto end discrimination is not over and a lot of hard work remains.

After his release from prison, Mr. Klippert moved to Edmonton, where he found work as a truck driver. He died in 1996, at the age of 69.

Laws prohibiting sexual acts between men, accompanied by very stiff penalties, predate Confederation. (The laws did not appear to contemplate the possibility of sex between women.) In the 1950s, governments in developed countries confronted two conflicting forces: the fear that homosexuals either were inclined to support communism or susceptible to blackmail by communists, and increasing pressure by voters – especially younger voters – to liberalize laws relating to sexuality.

While England and Wales decriminalized homosexual acts in 1967, in Canada the government of John Diefenbaker decided to toughen existing laws. In 1961, it changed the definition of a dangerous sexual offender to include anyone who was likely to re-offend after committing a sexual offence. Mr. Klippert was the first and only person to be held in preventive detention – in effect, a life sentence – because a judge found he was likely to continue to seek out other men for sex after he was released.

Although the Supreme Court upheld the designation, Chief Justice John Cartwright wrote a stinging dissent, saying “it means that every man in Canada who indulges in sexual misconduct … with another consenting adult male and who appears likely, if at liberty, to continue such misconduct should be sentenced to preventive detention,” which “would bring about serious overcrowding” in the nation’s prisons.

(Photos courtesy of Dave Chan for the Globe and Mail}

Trudeau lags on LGBT pardons


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Full Circle

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“It was so precious for me to see people really change their mindset about the problems they face. That’s what I want for my people.” ~ Sarah Rogers, Elder and Cultural Support Worker, Inuvik

Part of being human is getting hurt. Sometimes we hurt others; sometimes others hurt us. We even hurt ourselves. Holding onto this hurt and allowing it to dictate the course of our lives can have negative long-term consequences. Forgiveness can change the shape of our journeys. It can release anger, fear, judgement and resentment, and open the door to peace and a positive future.

FULL CIRCLE offers customized forgiveness programs for hurt people and communities. We excel in creating safe, experiential opportunities for people of all ages to explore what forgiveness means—and doesn’t mean—in their lives.  We also consult with non-profits, employers, community groups and schools interested in restorative solutions to repairing harm and peace building.

Who We Are

foundersWe, Katy Hutchison and Shannon Moroney, have walked the difficult and complex paths to forgiveness in our own lives. Now we work together to help our clients do the same.

We are Canadian women affected by violent crime, best-selling authors, sought-after public speakers, and advocates of restorative justice. We are volunteers with Leave Out Violence (LOVE), members of the international Forgiveness Project and we share our stories around the world. We first partnered in 2009 to create the F-Word, an experiential workshop designed to give participants an opportunity to explore what Forgiveness means and its transformative potential for healing. Since then, we have brought our life-changing programs to diverse settings in communities around the world.  

SHANNON MORONEY  was a teacher and counsellor when her husband kidnapped and boy orange3sexually assaulted two women in 2005. After personally discovering the lack of help available for families of criminals, and the vast ripple-effect of violent crime, she became a restorative justice advocate who speaks internationally on the topic.

In 2011, Shannon published her memoir Through the Glass, which became an instant national bestseller and was nominated for several awards, including the Governor General’s Award. In 2015, she co-produced “In Harm’s Way” for CBC Radio’s The Current. She lives in Toronto where she is remarried and the mother of twins.

KATY HUTCHISON was widowed and left with four year old twins following the murder of her husband in 1997. In meeting with the young man responsible, she learned that the only way through the trauma was by forgiveness and education.

Her memoir, Walking After Midnight (2006), was endorsed by the Dalai Lama and inspired Lifetime Network’s movie “Bond of Silence” (2010). Katy received the Me to We Social Action Award (2005) and was nominated for the Courage to Come Back award (2003). In 2013 she delivered a TEDx talk on rethinking education. Katy lives in Victoria. She speaks internationally on social responsibility & restorative justice issues.

For more information or to Learn more visit Fullcircle


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Victims and Survivors of Crime Week (Canada)

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Learning to live

Four years of judicial proceedings… It’s a long time! Yes, but putting an “end” to 25 years 6i3zxbkmof fear, shame, disgust, mistrust, feelings of injustice and negative repercussions of all kinds in my life, is worth the effort! It has been very hard, I won’t deny it, but I’m satisfied at having done it! I’m proud that I held on till the end. Luckily, I wasn’t alone. Counsellors from the CALACS and the CAVAC were there with me to accompany me, and the investigator in charge of my file was very nice and respectful.

jody-smilieWhen I started these proceedings, four years ago, I knew it would be long and difficult. It has been even longer and more difficult than what I had expected! Not encouraging, would you say? I would answer: let’s look at the positive side of things! And positive things did happen, indeed, from the moment I walked out of the Courthouse, feeling that I had recovered my freedom, my confidence, my life!

Today, I feel free. My heart is lighter. I really feel that I have turned an important page of my life, and I am deeply relieved of it. I cannot forget, of course. But I learn to live, day after day, with what I experienced during childhood. And when, for the glimpse of a moment, I remember that right now my aggressor is behind bars, 572320-tn_041 and that he was declared guilty in the eyes of society, my relief is even greater!

Ok, he didn’t receive the sentence that I would have given him (prison for life!), but I trust God that He’ll take care of judging him, for eternity.

Today, I realise that the judicial proceedings I instituted against my aggressor have made me a stronger woman, who can walk with her head held up high and look forward… to the future. That’s it!canadian-flag-background-for-canada-map

So, four years, to enable me to blossom for the rest of my life, I say: YES! I encourage each woman victim of sexual assault to denounce and file charges against her aggressor. Don’t be a victim anymore and get your dignity back, your confidence, your life!

 

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circle2To live, Finally ~ A person’s perception of themselves can be severely impacted by childhood trauma and abuse. Read how one survivor learned the key to her healing.

One Victim’s Story ~ A video interview with Sarah, who uses her own voice to let other victims of crime know that though each victim is unique, no victim is truly alone.

A Matter of Trust ~ Douglas Macklem was a victim of personal fraud who used both the criminal and civil courts to right the wrongs committed against him. He prepared a Victim Impact Statement for the courts.

circle2Lighting a Candle ~ Carolyn Swinson’s son Rob was killed by an impaired driver. Read her story, and how volunteering for Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) Canada helped in the healing process.

In the Wilderness A.M.’s story points to the need for more services for male victims of child sexual abuse. Through poetry and written testimony, A.M. describes how he had to rebuild his life and sense of self after being victimized as a young child.

My Angel, My Hero Tracey Lynn Jones, a victim of sexual and physical abuse at the hands of her father, shares how the understanding and support of a police officer helped her realize that there is hope.

circle2The Prey: An Account of Denunciation Martine Ayotte shares how she finally decided to speak out against her aggressor. She expresses gratitude to Centre d’aide aux victimes d’actes criminels (CAVAC) advocates who helped her manage the stress of the court proceedings.

The Journey Back Raymond shares his journey of recovery after suffering childhood abuse, hoping it will serve as a reminder that every life is precious and worth saving.

Victim Offender Mediation Program  Through the Victim Offender Mediation Program, Ellen met the offender who sexually assaulted her. Read about how her powerful encounter.

circle2Pathways As a young victim of sexual assault, a woman speaks about her lost childhood and the lasting impact. Read about how she makes quilts for those protecting her own child.

Helping hand A family’s life was shaken when they became the victims of a home invasion. Read about how Victim Service helped them move forward.

Learn more about Victims and Survivors of Crime Week

Statement by the Prime Minister of Canada on Christmas

Victims of Crime Research Digest No. 9

Government of Canada Launches Victims and Survivors of Crime Week

Have your say about our democracy!

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Preventing Injuries – Avoiding Sprains and Strains in The Workplace

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Preventing Injuries

4912144479158272Avoiding Sprains and Strains Online Training Train 100% online today and minimize risk of injury on the job site! This course is specifically designed for those whose work activities involve manual labour. You will find it covers introduction to ergonomics, musculoskeletal injury, signs, symptoms, and risk factors associated with the onset of a MSI Strategies to minimize both risk of injury and improve overall comfort.

Who is this training for?

Employees whose work activities include manual labour.

What does it cover?

  •  Introduction to ergonomics
  •  What is a musculoskeletal injury?
  • chuckie-ohs Signs, symptoms, and risk factors associated with the onset of a MSI
  •   Strategies to minimize both risk  of injury and improve overall comfort

Key Features & Benefits:

  •  Multimedia course with interactive and engaging content. Includes audio narration.
  •  Contains key components required under the Health and Safety Code Jurisdictions.
  •  Significantly reduces training costs often associated with in-person training or remote training sites.
  •  Employee can take the course at their convenience and revisit the content at any time.

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An Instant Solution For Infections In Your Workplace

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Courtesy of Canada’s Occupational Health & Safety Magazine and The Safety Shop Magazine

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One dead after school bus collides with car in Ottawa; no students injured


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Ontario Making College and University More Affordable

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Premier Wynne Meets with First Cohort to Benefit from New OSAP

wynne3Premier Kathleen Wynne met with Grade 12 students at Central Technical School in Toronto today to talk about reforms to the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP). Students in Grade 12 will be among the first to benefit from Ontario’s single largest modernisation of student financial assistance when the Ontario Student Grant launches as part of the reformed OSAP in September 2017.

Today, more Ontario students are graduating from post-secondary programs than ever before. But some youth hesitate to aspire to a college or university education because they worry about the costs or graduating with debt from student loans. The Ontario Student Grant will help OSAP empower more students to seek an advanced smilie-boy-blue-shirt2education based on their abilities and potential, not their family’s income. The new OSAP will:

  • Allow eligible students whose parents earn less than $50,000 to graduate without having to pay back provincial student loans
  • Provide the Ontario Student Grant to make the average cost of college and university tuition free for thousands of low- and middle-income students
  • Ensure that no eligible student receives less aid than they are eligible for now under the 30% Off Ontario Tuition Grant, which the new OSAP will replace.

Ontario’s highly educated workforce is one of its greatest economic strengths67 per cent of adults in the province now have a degree or diploma, higher than any country in the OECD and up from 56 per cent in 2002. By addressing the affordability barrier that can deter students from low- and middle-income families, these OSAP reforms will help meet or exceed the target of 70 per cent post-secondary attainment.

Investing in access to post-secondary education is part of the government’s economic plan to build Ontario up and deliver on its number-one priority to grow the economy and create jobs. graduateThe four-part plan includes helping more people get and create the jobs of the future by expanding access to high-quality college and university education. The plan is making the largest infrastructure investment in hospitals, schools, roads, bridges and transit in Ontario’s history and is investing in a low-carbon economy driven by innovative, high-growth, export-oriented businesses. The plan is also helping working Ontarians achieve a more secure retirement.

QUICK FACTS

  • About 150,000 students are expected to benefit from the reformed OSAP when implemented in 2017.
  • The Ontario government will work closely with colleges and universities to ensure that reading-a-bookfamilies see clearly up-front the difference between the sticker price for tuition and what the student would need to pay.
  • The new OSAP will allow mature students to qualify for more grants so they can go back to school to upgrade their skills.
  • Since 2002–03, Ontario has increased investment in publicly funded colleges and universities by $2.2 billion — an 82 per cent increase.

headshot“We are levelling the playing field so all students can go on to college or university no matter how much money their parents make. Changes to OSAP will build a more fair society by expanding access to education to help all Ontarians flourish — and strengthen our economy by further equipping our highly skilled and educated workforce.”

Kathleen Wynne ~ Premier of Ontario

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headshot-1“We believe that access to post-secondary education should be based on the ability to learn and not on the ability to pay. That’s why we’re moving forward with one of the most ambitious reforms of student financial assistance in North America.”

Deb Matthews ~ Deputy Premier, Minister of Advanced Education and Skills Development, and Minister Responsible for Digital Government

Article by Newsroom Ontario September 14, 2016

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Ontario Student Assistance Program

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Ontario Making Shingles Vaccine Free for Seniors

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Man imprisoned for being gay to get posthumous pardon from Trudeau

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‘It’s great that the young Trudeau is finishing the work that his father started,’ lawyer says.

images (31)Prime Minister Justin Trudeau intends to posthumously pardon Everett George Klippert who, because he admitted to police in the 1960s that he was gay, was deemed a dangerous sexual offender and sent to prison.

“The prime minister intends to recommend that a pardon under the authority of the Royal Prerogative of Mercy be granted posthumously to Mr. Klippert,” Trudeau’s office said in a media release.

The move was cheered Sunday by gay-rights advocates.

“It’s fantastic that he’ll get a posthumous pardon,” lawyer Doug Elliott told CBC News.

As well, the statement said the Liberal schalesgovernment will also look to see whether pardons are “warranted” after reviewing the cases of other individuals who in the past were convicted on charges such as gross indecency and buggery.

“As Canadians, we know that protecting and promoting fundamental human rights must be an imperative for governments and individuals alike, and this includes gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation,” the weekend statement said.

Trudeau’s office credited Klippert’s case for being “instrumental” in Canada’s decision to decriminalize homosexual acts between consenting adults.

images (9)Gay-rights activist applauds government commitment to review other cases of men convicted when homosexuality was a crime, you can also check out the video from CBC News here.

Indefinite prison sentence

6i3zxbkmKlippert was questioned by the RCMP in 1965 during an arson investigation in Pine Point, N.W.T. He wasn’t involved in the fire, but voluntarily said he’d had sexual relations with four men. He was charged with four counts of gross indecency, all for consensual, private, non-violent acts.

In 1966, Klippert was visited in prison by a Crown-appointed psychiatrist who concluded that Klippert’s homosexuality was “incurable,” and that he therefore met the criteria regarding dangerous sexual offenders.

A judge agreed and sentenced Klippert to preventive detention, meaning an indefinite term in prison.

The sentence was backed up by the Supreme Court of Canada in 1967, although Chief Justice John Cartwright suggested the laws regarding homosexuality be clarified, and that incarceration of harmless homosexuals was not their intention.

judge-smiley-emoticon-1The Klippert case stoked considerable media and political interest. Just six weeks later, Pierre Trudeau, the Liberal government’s justice minister (who would later become prime minister) introduced a bill that, among other things, called for the decriminalization of private, consensual homosexual acts between people over the age of 21.

“It’s great that the young Trudeau is finishing the work that his father started,” Elliott said.

Before homosexuality was decriminalized in 1969, people were routinely charged with gross indecency — a charge almost always applied to homosexuals — but rarely for private, consensual acts.

Klippert was released from prison on July 21, 1971. He was 69 when he died in in 1996.

images (4)“I never understood: Why didn’t Pierre Trudeau let him out in 1969 when they decriminalized gay sex?” Elliott said. “They kept the poor guy who was responsible for shining a light on this issue in jail for another couple of years.”

Last week, the prime minister confirmed he will march in Toronto’s Pride parade on July 3, a move that would make history with Trudeau being the first sitting PM in Canada to take part in the event.

Article for CBC News  ~ Posted: Feb 28, 2016


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A Constitution of Trust

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Trust is like paper, once it’s crumbled it won’t be perfect again

923004_10151331384711890_1479766938_nWith another year upon us, contained within the coming year is a future of events that hasn’t happened yet, a future you can carve, but only if you decide how it will play out rather then letting others decide for you! What worked for me was setting goals and I aimed high for them, never taking my eyes off the ball. smile-e-smiley-che-salta-immagine-animata-0141Set obtainable goals that will have a positive result to your benefit but be realistic, sincere and honest, also choose to do what you would want and love to do the rest of your life when setting your goals.

b3738e59ba1e78f8e9868bc8f052d89eSometimes you will experience hurdles which may appear there is no jumping over, going under or around, a blocked pathway and yes without a doubt there will be hurdles. I felt like giving up many times but when the going got tough I always turned to what I loved doing most, helping others, doing good, something that gave me gratitude and a since of purpose & pleasure, which indirectly gave me the motivation and determination to conquer and move past my own hurdles. 

I have also been quoted a few times regarding my patriotism, canada (1)the love for my country, to that I will add this, I love Canada because it is my home and it’s one of the best countries in the world to live, we as Canadians are known red_heartas a unique people with caring hearts for all humanity but as in every barrel their are rotten apples. Yes I was disappointed in my country and it’s peoples because I was being treated in a manner that Canadians actually condone (accept and allow, behaviour that is considered morally wrong or offensive to continue), and nobody would listen to flag-of-canadaor believe me but I never gave up and had faith in myself and my country knowing that eventually I would live again.

scratch-head03-idea-animated-animation-smiley-emoticon-000416-designIn closing I want to ask a question, there seems to be a hurdle that defies me, regarding a characteristic that it’s said cannot be bought or purchased, it cannot be stolen or taken by force rather it has to be earned and once it has been taken away you can never get it back!  left scratching my head, over the course of the last ten to fifteen years it seems without my knowledge I lost all my “TRUST” totally and I would welcome your opinion on how, if possible to regain it?


Article by Terry.K posted Jan 7, 2016


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Dying on the Streets: Homeless deaths in British Columbia

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At least 281 homeless people died in British Columbia between 2006 and 2013. The true number is likely much higher.

helpdownloadIt’s this rarely discussed statistic that inspired ‘Dying on the Streets,’ the first report of its kind to look at homeless deaths in the province.

As municipalities across B.C. struggle with increasing homelessness and the City of Vancouver works to try and end homelessness by 2015, little attention is paid to the hundreds of lives lost in the province simply because individuals could not access proper housing.

By highlighting the significant undercounting of homeless people who die in B.C. each year, illustrating the deadliness of homelessness, smileys-cz-2and demonstrating that these deaths are largely preventable, ‘Dying on the Streets’ aims to galvanize governments to do more to end homelessness in the province.

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Article by Condon, S., McDermid, J. Street ~ Corner Media Foundation, Megaphone Nov 12, 2014


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A Housing and Homelessness Research Strategy for Alberta: Supporting A Plan for Alberta: Ending Homelessness in 10 Years

Beyond Housing First: Essential Elements of a System-Planning Approach to Ending Homelessness

Occupation and the process of transition from homelessness


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Housing and Homelessness Election Guide 2015

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“Poverty is the worst form of Violence”
~ Mahatma Gandhi~

angel-smiley-emoticon-1forgottenHomelessness has grown to be a large problem in Canada, right about the time that the federal government’s investment in affordable housing declined. Over the last 25 years investments have declined by over 46%, from $115 to $60 annually per Canadian. Today, over 235,000 Canadians experience homelessness in a year and nearly 1 in 5 households are facing extreme housing affordability issues. In a country as prosperous as Canada, with a broadly shared and strong commitment to social justice, there is no need to accept or tolerate the experiences of poverty, hardship and homelessness. group_smileyIf federal investment in affordable housing increases to just $106 annually per Canadian, an increase of only 88 cents per person weekly, we can see an end to chronic homelessness and help others who are on the brink of becoming homeless.

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Article by The Homeless Hub Sept 17, 2015


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United Nations: Ratification of 18 International Human Rights Treaties

What is the most ratified human rights treaty? Which one did your country ratify? Find out using our NEW interactive dashboard on the status of ratification of International Human Rights Treaties: http://indicators.ohchr.org/Ratifications
Now lets take a closer look at just how much “value” Canada and the Harpercons have in Human Rights, according to the United Nations list of Ratified Human Rights Treaties, let it be known Canada doesn’t fair so well, all States need to take another look, try the second time around, looking with your “Heart” click here or the link above and see which ones your country Ratified.

I am including a list of the 5 out of 18 International Human Rights Treaties that Canada has currently Ratified and or Signed:

  1. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights: 1976, Signature: NA, Ratification/Accession 1976
    • 29 October 1979
      “The Government of Canada declares, under article 41 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, that it recognizes the competence of the Human Rights Committee referred to in article 28 of the said Covenant to receive and consider communications submitted by another State Party, provided that such State Party has, not less than twelve months prior to the submission by it of a communication relating to Canada, made a declaration under article 41 recognizing the competence of the Committee to receive and consider communications relating to itself.”
  2. Convention against Torture and other Cruel Inhuman or Degrading treatment or Punishment: 1987 Signature: 1985, Ratification/Accession: 1987
    • 13 November 1989
      “The Government of Canada declares that it recognizes the competence of the Committee Against Torture, pursuant to article 21 of the said Convention, to receive and consider communications to the effect that a state party claims that another state party is not fulfilling its obligations under this Convention.
      “The Government of Canada also declares that it recognizes the competence of the Committee Against Torture, pursuant to article 22 of the said Convention, to receive and consider communications from or on behalf of individuals subject to its jurisdiction who claim to be victims of a violation by a state party of the provisions of the Convention.”
  3. Convention on the Rights of The Child: Signature: 1990, Ratification/Accession: 1991
    • Reservations:
      “(i) Article 21 With a view to ensuring full respect for the purposes and intent of article 20 (3) and article 30 of the Convention, the Government of Canada reserves the right not to apply the provisions of article 21 to the extent that they may be inconsistent with customary forms of care among aboriginal peoples in Canada. “(ii) Article 37 (c) The Government of Canada accepts the general principles of article 37 (c) of the Convention, but reserves the right not to detain children separately from adults where this is not appropriate or feasible. Statement of understanding: “Article 30 It is the understanding of the Government of Canada that, in matters relating to aboriginal peoples of Canada, the fulfilment of its responsibilities under article 4 of the Convention must take into account the provisions of article 30. In particular, in assessing what measures are appropriate to implement the rights recognized in the Convention for aboriginal children, due regard must be paid to not denying their right, in community with other members of their group, to enjoy their own culture, to profess and practice their own religion and to use their own language.”
  4. Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of Children in Armed conflict: 2002 Signature: 2000, Ratification/Accession 2000
    • Declaration:
      “Pursuant to article 3, paragraph 2, of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on Involvement of Children in Armed Conflicts, Canada hereby declares: 1. The Canadian Armed Forces permit voluntary recruitment at the minimum age of 16 years. 2. The Canadian Armed Forces have adopted the following safeguards to ensure that recruitment of personnel under the age of 18 years is not forced or coerced: (a) all recruitment of personnel in the Canadian Forces is voluntary. Canada does not practice conscription or any form of forced or obligatory service. In this regard, recruitment campaigns of the Canadian Forces are informational in nature. If an individual wishes to enter the Canadian Forces, he or she fills in an application. If the Canadian Forces offer a particular position to the candidate, the latter is not obliged to accept the position; (b ) recruitment of personnel under the age of 18 is done with the informed and written consent of the person’s parents or legal guardians. Article 20, paragraph 3, of the National Defence Act states that ‘a person under the age of eighteen years shall not be enrolled without the consent of one of the parents or the guardian of that person’, (c) personnel under the age of 18 are fully informed of the duties involved in military service. The Canadian Forces provide, among other things, a series of informational brochures and films on the duties involved in military service to those who wish to enter the Canadian Forces; and (d) personnel under the age of 18 must provide reliable proof of age prior to acceptance into national military service. An applicant must provide a legally recognized document, that is an original or a certified copy of their birth certificate or baptismal certificate, to prove his or her age.”
  5. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: 2000 Signature: 2007, Ratification/Accession: 2010
    • Declaration and reservation:
      “Canada recognises that persons with disabilities are presumed to have legal capacity on an equal basis with others in all aspects of their lives. Canada declares its understanding that Article 12 permits supported and substitute decision-making arrangements in appropriate circumstances and in accordance with the law. To the extent Article 12 may be interpreted as requiring the elimination of all substitute decision-making arrangements, Canada reserves the right to continue their use in appropriate circumstances and subject to appropriate and effective safeguards. With respect to Article 12 (4), Canada reserves the right not to subject all such measures to regular review by an independent authority, where such measures are already subject to review or appeal. Canada interprets Article 33 (2) as accommodating the situation of federal states where the implementation of the Convention will occur at more than one level of government and through a variety of mechanisms, including existing ones.”

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The Supreme Court is Harper’s real Opposition

Supreme Court of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario
Supreme Court of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario

Worried on this Canada Day that an overbearing government is trying to change the country too much? Bothered that civil liberties are being sacrificed, that the government is trying to impose a moral code, that big monied interests are being catered to at the expense of the disadvantaged?

If so, you might find comfort in the work of our Supreme Court. Its rulings give it the look of standard-bearer for the proverbial little guy, the underdog’s ally. Its progressive orientation runs up against the Conservatives’ intent. Not by design, but in effect, it has become the Official Opposition in Ottawa, outdoing the New Democrats and Liberals.

Look at the recent decisions. Last week, the court delivered a major boost to the rights of native peoples with its landmark decision on land claims and aboriginal title. The decision gives First Nations broad bargaining powers and significantly complicates Ottawa’s resource development schemes. In the same week, the court struck a blow for labour rights, siding with the union representing former Wal-Mart employees in a dispute over compensation.

On privacy rights, the court recently denied police the right to subscriber information from Internet service providers without a warrant. Earlier, it stood up for the rights of sex workers, striking down anti-prostitution laws. And for those who feel the Conservatives have gone overboard with their throw-them-in-the-slammer take on criminal justice, there’s been Supreme Court resistance as well. Recent rulings have challenged mandatory minimums and other aspects of the government’s crime legislation.

How the Conservatives feel about most of these judgments does not have to be spelled out.

Court watchers are hard-pressed to remember another time when there’s been such a sharp ideological divide. For Prime Minister Stephen Harper, it’s doubly exasperating. He has long been an opponent of judicial activism and the weight justices have accorded the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. He can complain, but a majority of the Supreme Court’s justices are his own appointments. While his picks have been seen as somewhat more conservative than those made by Liberal prime ministers, the justices have failed to do his bidding.

Like most prime ministers, Mr. Harper seeks to impose his biases. His ideology runs stronger than others, however, and he is up against a court that tends to reflect Canadians’ centrist traditions. This has led to more contrast – and more conflict.

The conflict was compounded when the court dealt a public embarrassment to the Prime Minister by rejecting Marc Nadon, his Supreme Court nominee from Quebec. The court drove a dagger into his plans for Senate reform with a ruling that said such reform would require constitutional amendment. It would likely have shredded his electoral reform bill had it not been substantially changed.

It’s hardly a surprise that progressives are hailing the performance of Big Bench. “The court clearly understands what Canada is about,” one judge told me, “and they will not let this government cut its heart out. Unlike in the U.S., our Supreme Court really does act as a responsible check against ideological excesses of the government of the day. And unlike the U.S., our court has not been undermined by being politicized.”

That he didn’t politicize the court with more ideologically charged appointments may come to be one of Mr. Harper’s biggest regrets. In his years in power, he’s been able to bring many of Ottawa’s other institutions to heel. The big exception is the Supreme Court. It is the chief negator of his agenda.
LAWRENCE MARTIN – Special to The Globe and Mail – Published Tuesday, Jul. 01 2014, 6:00 AM EDT

I have made a short message of my thoughts on this article for Mr Harper, I have only one goal in life right now and that is to bring you down where you belong, your rain of terror ends here, I must apologize for my lack of Honor and respect, but you stole that from me in 2008, you will get the idea.

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{Bonne Fete} “Happy Birthday “Canada”

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Canada is a federal parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state.

canadianflagCanada Listeni/ˈkænədə/ is a country in North America consisting of 10 provinces and 3 territories. Located in the northern part of the continent, it extends from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean. At 9.98 million square kilometres in total, Canada is the world’s second-largest country by total area, and its common border with the United States is the world’s longest land border shared by the same two countries.

The land that is now Canada has been inhabited for millennia by various Aboriginal peoples. Beginning in the late 15th century, British and French colonies were established on the region’s Atlantic coast. As a consequence of various conflicts, the United Kingdom gained and lost North American territories until left in Canadian-smiley-facethe late 18th century with what mostly comprises Canada today. Pursuant to the British North America Act, on July 1, 1867 three colonies joined to form the autonomous federal dominion of Canada. This began an accretion of provinces and territories to the new self-governing dominion. In 1931, Britain granted Canada full independence in most matters with the Statute of Westminster 1931. The Canada Act 1982 severed the vestiges of legal dependence on the British parliament.

Canada is a federal parliamentary democracy and a constitutional monarchy, with Queen Elizabeth II as its head of state. Canada is a member of the Commonwealth of Nations. The country is officially bilingual at the federal level. It is one of the world’s most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many countries, with a population of approximately 35 million as of December 2012. Its advanced economy is one of the largest in the world, relying chiefly upon its abundant natural resources and well-developed trade networks. Canada’s long and complex relationship with the United States has had a significant impact on its economy and culture.

canadian-flag-heartCanada is a developed country and one of the wealthiest in the world, with the eighth highest per capita income globally, and the eleventh highest ranking in the Human Development Index. It ranks among the highest in international measurements of education, government transparency, civil liberties, quality of life, and economic freedom. Canada’s participation in economic international and intergovernmental institutions or groupings includes the G8 (Group of Eight); the Group of Ten (economic); the Group of Twenty (G-20 major economies); the North American Free Trade Agreement; and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation forum. Canada’s alliances include the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

Last updated July 1, 2016

Video Courtesy of Leanne Zackowski

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Canadian Torture Survivors Tell Their Stories

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unnamed (3)Now is the time to end torture everywhere, forever.

Torture is a brutal, dehumanizing act that is never acceptable under any circumstances.

It is banned by 155 countries. Yet it continues to flourish when police are not held accountable and when detainees are hidden from the outside world.

Here’s what else you can do:

  1. Use your voice to help torture victims today
  2. > Take action now

  3. Watch and share this video
  4. > Real stories told by Canadian victims of torture

  5. Tell the world it’s time to stop torture
  6. > Share a #stoptorture update, tweet or selfie

  7. Get active in your community
  8. > > Find out how to get involved

Watch for updates from Amnesty International about other ways you can be part of the #stoptorture campaign.

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Melissa Etheridge Takes Over World Pride 2014

imagehandlerWith her unique voice and killer songs, Melissa Etheridge has rocked the world for almost three decades! She’s won two Grammys, an Oscar and has a brand new album slated for this September. But when ET Canada sat down with the singer before the Opening Ceremony for “World Pride 2014” in Toronto – we found out Etheridge is most excited about her recent accomplishment – marrying the love of her life “Nurse Jackie” creator Linda Wallem.

Telling ET: “I’m dangerously close to being very corny, but (Linda) was like a dream, she was beautiful, the dress was amazing.” Gushing “I highly recommend falling in love with your best friend, it’s really amazing.”
<> on November 14, 2013 in Pacific Palisades, California.

The singer famously came out back in 1993 – long before it was deemed socially acceptable for a celebrity to speak openly about their sexuality. When asked about how things have changed for her over the years – Melissa recounted: “I was a teenager in the late ’70s… And I was understanding that gay was what I was. And at the time all I knew was that this was a very bad thing. To go from that in my teens to being in my ’50s, married and coming to World Pride, where over the next week there is going to be two million LGBT people here… if you would have told me back then, it would have been hard for me to imagine!”

By STEVEN BANKS 6/23/2014 at 5:23 PM ET
By STEVEN BANKS
6/23/2014 at 5:23 PM ET

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Harper government poll for Canada’s 150th birthday cites Liberal, NDP icons

The Queen signs Canada's constitutional proclamation in Ottawa on April 17, 1982 as Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau looks on. (RON POLING/Canadian Press)
The Queen signs Canada’s constitutional proclamation in Ottawa on April 17, 1982 as Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau looks on.
(RON POLING/Canadian Press)

Canadians have handed the Harper government a Top 10 list of the country’s greatest heroes, featuring some of the Conservative party’s greatest adversaries, past and present.

The list, compiled from online consultations in the run-up to Canada’s 150th birthday in 2017, includes Pierre Trudeau, Jack Layton, David Suzuki and Lester B. Pearson.

About 12,000 Canadians participated in the online exercise, which began Dec. 11 and closed last month.

A five-part digital form included the question: Which Canadians have inspired you the most over the last 150 years?

The Canadian Heritage Department extracted a Top 10 list for an April 29 briefing note for the minister, Shelly Glover.

Only one clearly identifiable Conservative appears: Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada’s first prime minister, in eighth place.

The list was topped by former Liberal prime minister Pierre Trudeau, followed by marathon-of-hope runner Terry Fox; NDP leader Tommy Douglas; former Liberal prime minister Lester B. Pearson; astronaut Chris Hadfield; environmental activist David Suzuki; NDP leader Jack Layton; Sir. John A.; hockey legend Wayne Gretzky; and Romeo Dallaire, the soldier and Liberal senator who recently announced his resignation.

The consultation also asked which of Canada’s accomplishments of the last 150 years “make you most proud to be a Canadian?”

stop-har-meMedicare topped that list, followed by peacekeeping, then the 1982 Charter of Rights and Freedoms at No. 3.

The Conservative government, which has recently been buffeted by a series of Charter-based losses at the Supreme Court of Canada, did not mark the 25th anniversary of the Charter in 2007, nor the 30th in 2012.

The rest of the accomplishments list, in order: contribution to the Second World War; the Canadarm; multiculturalism; contribution to the First World War; bilingualism; space exploration; and the Constitution Act of 1982.

The briefing note and related documents were obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act.

Glover said the exercise was simply to consult Canadians about how to celebrate 2017, adding “we have no intention of making a kind of final list.”

“Every community is going to have their own personal list. … We will not be telling people whom they ought to be celebrating.”

“The consultations were not partisan in any way shape or form,” she said in an interview from her Winnipeg riding, noting for example that many Canadians do not regard Tommy Douglas as a New Democrat politician but simply as the father of medicare.

The government has yet to announce its budget and “overall theme and focus” for the 2017 celebrations. Glover would not provide a timeline.

But she said all events will be planned in partnership with provinces, communities and the private sector, include sharing costs.

A spokeswoman for Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, Kate Purchase, declined comment on the high position of his father on the Top 10 list of heroes.

The briefing note warns the results of the online consultations cannot be viewed as representative of the entire population, because participants self-selected.

In the end, the exercise identified more than 1,100 “inspirational” Canadians and more than 600 accomplishments.

In February, Canadian Heritage took a sample of 1,540 responses from the first 5,000 questionnaires filed, adjusting them to be regionally balanced based on population, and then produced the Top 10 lists.

The early sample was taken “so the results would not be skewed by publicity surrounding the Sochi Olympic Winter Games.”

Cabinet ministers have also held at least 20 roundtables since December, asking participants the same questions about heroes and accomplishments. Those Top 10 lists looked very similar to those of the online survey — though there, Sir John A. did not make the grade.

A House of Commons committee in September 2012 pressed the government to start planning for the 150th birthday celebrations “as soon as possible,” noting the planning for Canada’s 1967 Centennial bash took eight years, launched by Progressive Conservative prime minister John Diefenbaker.

The 1967 celebrations cost about $750 million in today’s dollars.
DEAN BEEBY – OTTAWA — The Canadian Press – Published Sunday, Jun. 15 2014, 7:32 AM EDT
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Pride is My Co-Pilot

Tomorrow at 5:30PM, Pride Toronto’s Exec. Dir. will be part of Pilot PMR’s panel discussion on the ways LGBT rights have helped market our city to the world! Interested in attending this FREE event, find more information here: http://pilotpmr.com/pride-is-my-co-pilot/

Where: 250 the Esplanade, Courtyard 107, in the historic Berkeley Castle!

RSVP via email leah.fraser@pilotpmr.com
5836245762572288

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Workplace Isolation Is Silent Form of Bullying

Isolation at work can be a silent form of bullying. Credit: Man standing alone image via Shutterstock
Isolation at work can be a silent form of bullying.
Photo Credit: Shutterstock

You’re better off getting picked on in the office than not getting any attention at all, new research suggests.

Being ignored at work is worse for an employee’s physical and mental well-being than harassment or bullying, according to a study set to be published in the journal Organization Science.Researchers found that while most people consider ostracism less harmful than bullying, feelings of exclusion are significantly more likely to lead to job dissatisfaction, quitting and health problems.

“We’ve been taught that ignoring someone is socially preferable — if you don’t have something nice to say, don’t say anything at all,” said Sandra Robinson, one of the study’s authors and a professor in the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business. “But ostracism actually leads people to feel more helpless, like they’re not worthy of any attention at all.”

Researchers based their conclusions on a series of surveys. The first one determined that people consistently rate workplace ostracism as more socially appropriate, less psychologically harmful and less likely to be prohibited than workplace harassment.

Additional surveys showed that employees who claimed to have experienced ostracism were significantly more likely to report health problems, a degraded sense of workplace belonging and commitment, and a stronger intention to quit their jobs.

The researchers also examined a previous employment survey that included feedback on feelings of workplace isolation and harassment and compared it to turnover rates three years after the survey was conducted. They found that people who reported feeling ostracized were significantly more likely to quit.

“There is a tremendous effort underway to counter bullying in workplaces and schools, which is definitely important. But abuse is not always obvious,” Robinson said. “There are many people who feel quietly victimized in their daily lives, and most of our current strategies for dealing with workplace injustice don’t give them a voice.”

The study was co-authored by University of Ottawa professor Jane O’Reilly, University of Toronto professor Jennifer Berdahl and Sharif University of Technology professor Sara Banki.

Originally published on Business News Daily
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by Chad Brooks, BusinessNewsDaily Senior Writer | June 02, 2014 08:29am ET

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The Pressure’s On Harper to End Online Spying — Let’s Keep it Up

n-ONLINE-SPYING-CANADA-large570It looks like the rumble against the government’s Online Spying Bill C-13 is turning into a roar.

Leading Conservative elder statesman Stockwell Day has joined the growing chorus of Canadians speaking out about how Bill C-13 would expose law-abiding Canadians to warrantless government spying. If passed, the controversial bill would grant immunity to telecom companies who hand our private information to the government without a warrant.

In hard-hitting remarks on CBC’s Power and Politics, Stockwell Day expressed sympathy with the views of Ontario Privacy Commissioner Ann Cavoukian, who recently called for Bill C-13 to be split to remove its online spying proposals:

“There can be an overreaction in terms of how you correct it. So [Cavoukian is] raising a bit of an alarm here. Let’s be very careful in how we could protect someone in a situation like this, but let’s also be careful in going too far and limiting even things like free speech, [or using] invasive techniques that could be employed by policing.”

“I’m hoping they take another look at this and kind of curtail some of those powers,” Day added.

These remarks by such a prominent senior Conservative (Day is the former leader of the Canadian Alliance, the forerunner to today’s Conservative party) are sure to add to the growing pressure on Defence Minister Peter MacKay to split C-13.

Day’s comments come hot on the heels of passionate Parliamentary testimony by Carol Todd, the mother of cyberbullying victim Amanda Todd. Carol bravely told key MPs to stop using bullied children as an excuse to drive forward measures that undermine everybody’s privacy:

The message from all this is clear — the long-simmering rumble of discontent about reckless and out-of-control government spying is turning into an upsurge, as more and more Canadians speak out. Stockwell Day’s intervention yesterday is particularly significant. A key turning point in the successful battle against the government’s previous spying bill (C-30) was when conservatives started to speak out.

After all, there’s no doubt that Stockwell Day is speaking on behalf of countless grassroots conservative supporters across the country. A recent poll revealed that millions of Conservative voters are opposed to mass surveillance. We hope that pressure from Canadians will encourage Conservative MPs to start speaking out about the hugely unpopular blanket spying measures in Bill C-13. They should put both public and private pressure on Defence Minister MacKay to split the bill and remove the online spying provisions. continue reading »» Posted: 05/24/2014 11:37 pm by David Christopher Communications Manager for OpenMedia.ca

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The Doctor’s Office

6435-ErinMillspkwyNow lets explore the medical profession and their criminal interference, or were they directed by an much larger entity to commit these violations! For those of you who have been following my story are aware of my issue of teeth grinding while sleeping which without a doubt has been a long time standing medical issue for me with numerous trips per month for medical treatment due to headaches, toothaches and earaches, not to mention prostate issues.
While employed at SunGard I did have a family physician Dr. So located five minutes from work at THE DOCTOR’S OFFICE Medical Clinic, 6435 Erin Mills Parkway, Mississauga, Ontario.
On May 29, 2008 I had to pay an emergency visit to the Doctor’s Office Medical Clinic due to extreme pain of another tooth infection. At the time my Family Doctor, Dr. So was not available or in the office so I seen the Doctor currently on call, Dr. Saleem Hala. Due to the fact I was in extreme pain, I saw the Doctor without waiting. During the examination the doctor had me open my mouth as wide as possible as she used a tongue depressor to locate the tooth in question, once she located the tooth and I confirmed, with a sudden jab at the tooth caused me to spring from the table I was sitting on, now in even worst pain, while still holding the left side of my face yelling at her and immediately exiting the room and left the office as fast as possible.
On June 2, 2008 I sent a letter stating my disgrace with what I experienced on my last and final visit I would ever make to the Doctor’s Office, requesting all personal information with in my file returned to me immediately. I also filed a complaint with the Ontario Medical Association.
Now not having a family Doctor and not long after the incident at The Doctor’s Office I received a flyer in the mail for a new Walk-in Medical Clinic located not far from home on Lakeshore Blvd and Hurontario Street area. This clinic had weekend hours so as not to miss any more time from work the following Saturday I proceeded to check it out. Upon arriving and entering the front door I was greeted by an empty waiting room, an Asian individual in a white long coat whom appeared to be a Doctor and a white Caucasian lady sitting behind the counter, I was taken in immediately for an examination.
As I was there to inquire about the issue of teeth grinding and a remedy to help stop or decrease the frequency of the grinding. The doctor insisted on learning a little more about my medical history before beginning any treatment. After I briefly explained my current medical history which included the issues I was having regarding prostate infections. Knowing this he suggested he start with a prostate exam. I am sure as men we are aware of how a prostate exam is preformed, and many of us refuse this examination due to shame and the process which it is preformed, entry through the anus, which to start with is very personal and uncomfortable, but I agreed and followed his instructing, which I will omit for now. The process involves inserting a finger in the anus to check for swelling of the prostate gland. Once I was laid on my left side with my knees to my chest and my back turned to him he inserted a blunt object into the anus which caused extreme pain causing me to fall from the other side of the table to the floor. At this point as I pick myself off the floor now in servere pain, barely able to stand. Once I was on my feet, now getting back in my clothing as fast as possible, he says while sitting on a step stool, suggesting I stand in front of him. I said nothing and made my way out of the office to the front exit, the lobby now empty, I hear him saying and I quote “You have been just fucked up the ass by the Canadian Government”
I experienced bleeding for a few days and feared going to the washroom but the pain did not subside until a few weeks had passed.
The next day on Sunday, now full of anger and upset I contacted friends and told them about what happened, they we’re in disbelief and offered to pay the office a visit with me. I agreed so two days later on Monday we drove to the Walk-in clinic and I was shocked to find the unit had paper covering the inside of the windows and a for rent sign in the door, the appearance of a long time vacant unit.

This is also why I was assaulted by employees of Richcraft whom I believe was under orders to commit the assault.

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Add your name — support Justin as he hits the road

Add your name and support Justin as he hits the roadon-the-road
Ajoutez votre nom — appuyez Justin alors qu’il se dirige vers vous
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CHILDREN CAN NOW SEEK JUSTICE FOR ABUSES THROUGH UNITED NATIONS

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C.C.R.C urges Canada to ratify new treaty
CANADA, January 15, 2014 – Children whose human rights have been violated will finally be able to bring their cases to the United Nations after a new international treaty enacted on January 14, 2014.

Until this recent UN action and despite its near universal ratification the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child was the only international human rights treaty that had no mechanism for victims to seek justice internationally when they could not get redress for violations of their rights nationally.

The new treaty, known as the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on a Communications Procedure (OP3 CRC) was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in December 2011. The treaty will become active in three months’ time after Costa Rica ratified it on January 14. Albania, Bolivia, Gabon, Germany, Montenegro, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain and Thailand previously ratified.

A State is not bound by the treaty until it ratifies it. Campaigners are urging governments around the world, including Canada, to ratify the new treaty so more children can access justice at the UN. Ratify OP3 CRC, an international coalition of children’s rights NGOs, says the UN will now be better equipped to address future violations of children’s rights, and more pressure will be put on countries to ensure children’s rights are respected.

Cheryl Milne, Chair of the Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children says, “This is an important step in ensuring that children’s rights are taken seriously. Canada should show its commitment to the rights of children by ratifying this protocol.”

Cases brought under this new communications procedure will be heard by the Committee on the Rights of the Child, the UN body of 18 independent experts responsible for ensuring the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child. From 14 April 2014, victims of all new or ongoing violations in States who have ratified the treaty can start bringing cases to the Committee if no solution is found nationally. The treaty does not cover past violations.

“This new international treaty enacted by the UN is a major human rights victory and milestone for children across the world, especially those who are routinely affected and threatened by violence, sexual abuse, trafficking, and discrimination,” said Rosemary McCarney, President and CEO of Plan Canada. “When Canada and more states move to ratify this protocol, more children around the world will finally have access to the means and channels they deserve to have their rights respected and to call on their governments to take action to protect them.”

About the Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children (CCRC)

The Canadian Coalition for the Rights of Children (CCRC) is a network of Canadian organizations and individuals who promote respect for the rights of children. Its purpose is to: exchange information; provide public education materials about the Convention on the Rights of the Child; monitor implementation of the Convention in Canada; and engage in dialogue with government officials on child rights issues. The Convention on the Rights of the Child is the guiding framework for all activities of the coalition. Visit http://rightsofchildren.ca for more information.

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