🇺🇸 The Matthew Shepard Foundation

matthew shepard2Our Mission

The Matthew Shepard Foundation empowers individuals to embrace human dignity and diversity through outreach, advocacy and resource programs. We strive to replace hate with understanding, compassion and acceptance.

About Us

the-shepardsOn October 7, 1998, Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old student at the University of Wyoming, was brutally attacked and tied to a fence in a field outside of Laramie, Wyoming. and left to die. On October 12, Matt succumbed to his wounds in a hospital in Fort Collins, Colorado.

In the aftermath of Matt’s death, Judy and Dennis Shepard started the Matthew Shepard Foundation to honour his life and aspirations. Because of the tragedy endured by the Shepards.

“The beginning principle of the Foundation was to teach parents with children who may be questioning their sexuality to love and accept them for who they are, and to not throw them away.”

clipart-girl-wearing-pink-glasses-smiley-emoticon-Through her personal appearances across the country and around the world, Judy Shepard shares Matt’s story to highlight the importance of standing up for the LGBT community.

Since our formation, the Foundation has centred its efforts on providing a voice and support for LGBT youth with our online resource center Matthew’s Place, helped pioneer the country’s first federal hate crimes legislation with the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd, Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, and create dialogue about hate and acceptance within communities with special support for The Laramie Project and The Laramie Project: Ten Years Later.

stop-homophobia-d76466947It is our sincerest hope that, one day, the Foundation may be able to close its doors. But the same hate and violence that sparked the Foundation’s formation still exists today, both at home and abroad. We will continue to work tirelessly to ensure safety, visibility and inclusiveness for the entire LGBT community until that ideal becomes reality.

Matthew’s Story

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matthew shepard3The story of Matthew Shepard began on December 1, 1976 when he was born to Judy and Dennis Shepard in Casper, Wyoming. He went to public school in Casper until his junior year of high school when he moved with his family to Saudi Arabia. Matt had to finish his high school education at The American School in Switzerland because there were no American high schools in Saudi Arabia at the time. In both high schools, he was elected by his peers to be a peer counselor. He was easy to talk to, made friends easily and actively fought for the acceptance of all people.

boy smilie3Matt had a great passion for equality. His experiences abroad fueled his love for travel and gave him the chance to make many new friends from around the world. Matt’s college career eventually took him back to Wyoming where he studied political science, foreign relations and languages at the University of Wyoming in Laramie.

emoticon gif animated smile glitter 56The horrific events that took place shortly after midnight on October 7, 1998 would become one of the most notorious anti-gay hate crimes in American history and spawned an activist movement that, more than a decade later, would result in passage of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, a federal law against bias crimes directed at lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people. Two men, Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson, abducted Matt and drove him to a remote area east of Laramie, Wyoming. He was tied to a split-rail fence where the two men severely assaulted him with the butt of a pistol. He was beaten and left to die in the cold of the night. Almost 18 hours later, he was found by a bicyclist who initially mistook him for a scarecrow.

Matt died on October 12 at 12:53 a.m. at Poudre Valley Hospital in Fort Collins, Colorado with his family by his side. His memorial service was attended by friends and family from around the world and garnered immense media attention that brought Matt’s story to the forefront of the fight against bigotry and hate.

ar12648297317694The life and death of Matthew Shepard changed the way we talk about, and deal with, hate in America. Since his death, Matt’s legacy has challenged and inspired millions of individuals to erase hate in all its forms. Although Matt’s life was short, his story continues to have a great impact on young and old alike. His legacy lives on in thousands of people who actively fight to replace hate with understanding, compassion, and acceptance.

About the Film

Michele Josue, friend and filmmaker: “As the media stripped my friend of his humanity, I made a promise to myself that when I was emotionally and artistically ready, I would share, with the world, who Matt really was — in the only way I knew how, through film.”

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Judy Shepard, Matt’s mother and president of the Matthew Shepard Foundation: “I hope people will be reminded that Matt was an ordinary boy who experienced both struggles and triumphs in his life, that he was real to so many people … People see parts of themselves in Matt, both good and bad, and then the message sinks in, that these victims are more than icons or figures. They’re people who feel love, pain, happiness and sadness. They had lives familiar to our own, but somehow some of us are allowed to live when others aren’t. When people see and hear about the real Matt, the Matt we knew, it’s my hope they’ll understand what we’re fighting so tirelessly for.”

Watch the Full length movie below

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Matthews Place

The Matthew Shepard Foundation

Matthew Shepard Foundation on facebook

‘Matt Shepard Is a Friend of Mine,’ and My Son

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Elder Abuse Awareness

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“Age is whatever you think it is. You are as old as you think you are” ~  Muhammad Ali

Learn the signs and break the silence

elderElder abuse is any action or inaction by self or others that old-lady-driving-smiley-emoticonjeopardises the health or well-being of any older adult.

Elder abuse can take several forms including financial, emotional, physical, sexual, neglect and medication. Often more than one type of abuse occurs at the same time. The two most frequently identified and reported types of elder abuse in Canada are financial and emotional.

Coordinated Community Response Grant Program

3D_14_iconThe Taking Action Against Elder Abuse Coordinated Community Response Grant Program is a 3-year initiative aimed at supporting the development or enhancement of coordinated community response models.

Stop financial abuse

angry-old-man-smiley-emoticonFinancial abuse is one of the most frequently reported forms of elder abuse in Alberta. To help you learn the signs of financial abuse, how to protect yourself from it, and what steps you can take if you or someone you know is experiencing financial abuse, a PowerPoint presentation is available for you to download to share with others.

Help for victims of crime

The Criminal Code of Canada sets out a variety of criminal offences that can occur in the old-person-helped-to-walk-smiley-emoticoncontext of elder abuse. These include offences such as physical or sexual assault; offences against the rights of property, such as property theft, forgery and extortion; and other offences such as breach of trust and fraud. While no one ever expects to be a victim of crime, it is important to know there is help available to you.

If you have been a victim of crime, your first step is to call the police. They will investigate the crime and refer you to the Victim Services Unit for assistance. Victim Services Units Police-police-officer-uniform-smiley-emoticon-001085-facebookare staffed with trained, caring people who offer information, assistance and support to victims during the police investigation and throughout the criminal justice process.

  • For more information contact your local police, or
  • Call 780-427-3460 (toll-free by first dialing 310-0000), or
  • Visit the Victim Services Unit website at www.victims.alberta.ca

Article by the Alberta Government

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Standing Together to Stop the Violence

white-house-finishHating people because of their colour is wrong. And it doesn’t matter which colour does the hating. It’s just plain wrong. ~ Muhammad Ali

The following is a message I received yesterday and thought it would be a benefit to my American friends, but also realising it’s a piece of advise that would not hurt for us all to consider, and deserves to be shared…Peace&Love Terry.K.

“This violence has to stop”

smilie-policeThis has been a trying week for America, as Americans, we are all wounded by the targeting of the police force in Dallas and the deaths in St. Paul and Baton Rouge, now, I know a lot of you might ask, “What can I do?”
You can do a lot—right now, this weekend.
This weekend, it is on each of us to be a visible force in our communities for non-violence. Join together online, in your neighbourhood, in your houses of worship, around your kitchen table. For all of you community leaders, use your platforms to heal and unite. Talk and listen, see and hear each other during this moment for our country that requires profound introspection and dialogue. To find helpful resources in your community, visit the Department of Justice’s Community Relations Service at www.justice.gov/CRS.
For if not you, then whom? If not now, then when?
 
In the days and weeks ahead, we’ll continue offering our thoughts and prayers to provide comfort to the broken-hearted families. But they will only be redeemed by the courage of our actions americathat honour their memories.
I believe the Dallas Police Department is one of the finest in the nation—and this incredibly diverse city can bridge any divide. 

To paraphrase Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, let us use our words carefully. Let us act with unity, not division.

As Dallas Police Chief David Brown—one of the leading chiefs in America—said, “there are no words to describe the atrocity that occurred to our city, all I know is that this must stop, this divisiveness between our police and our citizens.”

Captain-America-Captain-America-Captain-America-Smiley-Avengers-smiley-emoticon-001101-facebookThis violence has to stop, it is not normal, and it is not who we are, so while we’re being tested, we can’t be pulled apart,  we are America, with bonds that hold us together.

We endure, we overcome, we stand together.


Joe Biden

Vice President of the United States 
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Forces of Change by Julio Frenk – Jun 16, 2016

The Fight for Global LGBT Justice Cannot Wait

How Our Collective Action Can Change the World

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Cyndi Lauper: We Need to End LGBT Youth Homelessness

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“A feeling of deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one’s own achievements, the achievements of one’s close associates, or from qualities or possessions that are widely admired.” ~ Pride

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The music and Broadway icon talks about #40toNoneDay and what it means for the cause she’s long championed.

cyndi2It’s an election year and there’s a lot of talk about what our nation’s priorities need to be for the next four to eight years. What we have to make sure is not forgotten is the clapperepidemic of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth homelessness. Up to 40 percent of homeless youth identify as LGBT, yet fewer than 7 percent of kids nationwide are LGBT. That discrepancy is outrageous, and it’s something we can’t ignore. That’s why, on April 27, 2016, we will raise our voices for #40toNoneDay: a national day organized by the True Colors Fund to raise public awareness about LGBT youth homelessness.

While family rejection is the most commonly cited reason for LGBT youth homelessness, it’s just one piece of the puzzle — a very big puzzle. We need to make sure we’re seeing the whole picture.

2d686d1cb28980968faaff983481b228People often think that because they don’t work at a homeless shelter, they don’t have a role to play. The reality is: everyone can make a difference! Think of it this way: Kids experiencing homelessness come into contact with more than just the good folks working at shelters. They also go to coffee shops and libraries. They ride the bus. They’re on the Internet. You may interact with them on a regular basis without even realizing it. We all need to put our heads together to make sure these young people can get support wherever they go — and be themselves when they get there.

sk8er-smiley-emoticonRight now people all across America are making a difference. A 24-hour diner owner in North Carolina is giving kids a place to stay when they have nowhere else to go. A library in Indiana is letting kids without a permanent address use computers to access lifesaving resources. In Minnesota police officers are using an app developed by the community to help kids find shelters with available beds. There are many more possibilities that have yet to be explored. That’s why we need to keep the conversation going.

Youth are our future, but they’re also our present. We need to make these kids our priority now. If we don’t, where will they be in five, 10, 20 years? Where will our country be? Even if shyly-smileywe all agree that ending LGBT youth homelessness needs to be a priority, how can we rise above the noise and make our message heard? Our voices are stronger when we say something together. Last year, #40toNoneDay reached more than 17 million people. How many more can we reach this year?

CYNDI LAUPER is a Tony-, Emmy-, and Grammy-winning writer, actor, and musician. She is also the cofounder of the True Colors Fund, which combats LGBT youth homelessness.

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Scotland is training a small army of LGBT-friendly police

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“I can do things you cannot, you can do things I cannot; together we can do great things.” ~ Mother Teresa

CRIMES against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people are under-reported and police hope the move makes it easier for them to come forward.

Mac-mac-apple-busy-smiley-emoticon-000712-facebookABOUT 60 police officers are being given special training to help crack down on hate crime against members of the LGBTI community .

The Equality Network charity has teamed up with Police Scotland to deliver a training programme for officers around the country.

policeIt is hoped they will go on to form a new network of liaison officers who can be contacted by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people who believe they have been a victim of a crime.

Experts hope the programme will increase public confidence in the police and encourage people to speak up about a form of crime which has typically been under-reported.

Scott Cuthbertson, of the Equality Network, said: “We know too many LGBTI people are the victims of hate crime , but we also know that many, for whatever reason, still do not report hate crimes. We want to change that.

587245,1310684605,1“That’s why we are pleased to be working so closely with Police Scotland, the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service and other criminal justice agencies to provide training on LGBTI issues and to work together to remove the barriers to reporting a hate crime.”

The officers will also be expected to advise their colleagues across the force on LGBTI issues.

Meanwhile, the Equality Network will also provide training for staff at the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service , and LGBT Youth Scotland will roll out an anti-bullying programme in schools.

The number of charges for sexual orientation aggravated crime has risen since hate crime legislation came into effect in Scotland in March 2010, to stand at 841 in 2014-15, the Equality Network said.

Police officers will be trained and will pass their knowledge on to other staff

While reporting of transphobic hate crime remains low at 21 charges that year, there is said to be evidence of significant under-reporting.

A recent report by the charity found almost half of LGBT respondents had experienced or witnessed an incident of prejudice or discrimination in the past month, rising to 79% within the past year and 97% within their lifetimes.

Superintendent Jim Baird said tackling hate crime is a priority for Police Scotland.

MCj04298110000[1]He said: “If anyone feels they have been the victim of, or witness to, a crime which is motivated by malice or ill will because of sexual orientation or gender identity they should report it to us directly, online or through a third party reporting site.”

Fergus McMillan, chief executive of LGBT Youth Scotland, added: “We are currently working with a range of partners, including Equality Network, to increase the reporting of homophobic, biphobic and transphobic hate crimes and incidents and improve the support available to those targeted.”

The initiatives are part of the national LGBT hate crime partnership, which brings together 35 organisations from across the UK.

Article posted ~ 14 Mar 2016 ~ b Hilary Duncanson for The Daily Record

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Searching for Suicide Methods

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Suicide-Methods1-642x336Youth suicide rates are sadly out of control. Research from the Center for Disease Control (CDC) says among young people, suicide is third leading cause of their death. About 4,600 young people, between the ages of ten to twenty-four, die from suicide each year.

Death is not the only result from a suicide attempt, because more people survive than die. Around 147,000 youth end up in hospital emergency rooms each year with a self-inflicted injury. Some survivors have permanent damage from the suicide attempt, such as having a brain injury or paralysis. Those who survive have a higher risk of attempting suicide again.

Suicide methods statistics say forty-five percent use guns, forty percent use hanging or suffocating, and eight percent use drug overdoses or poison.

The CDC reports many young people are thinking about suicide. A survey across America found sixteen percent of high school students had seriously contemplated suicide, thirteen percent had made a plan, and eight percent attempted suicide.

Suicide affects all youth. Males die from suicide more frequently than females, but females make more attempts. Deaths from suicides, for ten to twenty-four year-olds, were eighty-one percent boys and nineteen percent girls. Native American youth have the highest suicide rates. Hispanic youth report more suicide attempts than blacks or Caucasians. Suicide is especially impactful for those who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT). Bullying is a major cause of youth suicide, when those under attack see no other way out. Many adults question why don’t these depressed youth seek help or reach out. Often they do reach out, but others ignore calls for help or do not take them seriously. In the case of bullying, often a call for help has no effect whatsoever on the daily torments these youth are facing.


The Search for Suicide Methods for Teens and Youth Today, Shocking!


There are certain risk factors, which may influence whether a young person attempts suicide. Just because the risk factors exist, does not mean they will attempt suicide. Nevertheless, these are the warning signs as published by the CDC:

  • A previous attempt of suicide
  • Suicide of another family member
  • Mental health problems and depression
  • Using drugs or alcohol
  • A life event, which is extremely stressful
  • A major loss
  • Easy access to firearms or other suicide methods
  • Other youth’s suicidal behavior (copy-cat syndrome)
  • Going to jail

If any of these risk factors are present, there are things to do to help a suicidal young person.


Read the complete story here.


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ABCs of Children’s Mental Health: Bullying and LGBT Kids

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How can families, schools, and communities prevent and protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth from being bullied?


Kosciw and colleagues surveyed students 13 to 21 years of age throughout the United States. Of the 7,261 students who identified themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender or who were questioning their sexual identity (LGBTQ): 85 percent reported being verbally harassed in the last year; 47 percent had been shoved; 22 percent had been punched, kicked or injured with a weapon at school; 68 percent had been sexually harassed at school with unwanted touching or sexual remarks; 88 percent had felt deliberately excluded or left out by other students; 84 percent had rumors or lies told about them; and half reported their property had been stolen or purposefully damaged by other students.


According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, the third leading cause of death for youth 15 to 24 years old is suicide and gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth are 4 times more likely to attempt suicide than their heterosexual peers.

In one study, LGBT youth identified bullying problems as the second most important problem in their lives, after non-accepting families, compared to non-LGBT youth identifying classes, exams, and grades.


Kerry Kennedy stated, “Bullying is, at its core, a human rights violation. It is the abuse of the powerless at the hands of the powerful, and it is a threat against the right to receive an education free from persecution.” Visit http://www.stompoutbullying.org

In the 1970s, The American Psychiatric Association and the American Psychological Association stated that homosexuality is not a disorder; sexual orientation is not a person’s individual choice; and mental health professionals cannot change the sexual orientation of their clients.


What can Schools do?


The 2011 National School Climate survey recommends that Gay Straight Alliances (GSAs) be ongoing in schools. Students who attended schools with GSAs reported fewer harassing remarks about sexual orientation, more intervention from school personnel and a greater sense of connectedness.
LGBT Students who reported having six or more supportive staff had higher GPAs. Principals, teachers, and other school staff can be advocates of safe schools for all students.
Schools can create comprehensive anti-bullying/harassment policies that include LGBT students.


LGBTQ Resources


The Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) and its Greater Cincinnati, Greater Dayton and Northeast Ohio chapters gave middle and high schools a Safe Space Kit as part of a campaign to build support for vulnerable students and reduce anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) name-calling, bullying and harassment in their school. Visit http://www.glsen.org.

The Trevor Project, created after the short film called Trevor, is a national organization that provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning (LGBTQ) young people ages 13-24. Visit http://www.thetrevorproject.org/.

It Gets Better Project‘s was created after several LGB students committed suicide after being bullied in school. It has inspired 50,000 user-created videos viewed more than 50 million times. Visit http://www.itgetsbetter.org/.


According to Buckeye Region Anti Violence Organization (BRAVO)


“homophobia is the irrational fear or hatred of Gay and Lesbian people. It can be the cause of conflicts in neighborhoods, workplaces, and homes.”

Visit http://www.bravo-ohio.org.


The Community Relations Service of the Department of Justice helps communities develop strategies to prevent and respond to violent hate crimes committed on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion or disability. Visit http://www.justice.gov.


Please see a child therapist if your LGBT adolescent is showing signs of depression, anxiety, or making comments about suicide. Ask your pediatrician for a referral.


Melissa Martin, Ph.D., is a child therapist in Jackson, Ohio – Posted: Tuesday, September 2, 2014


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End Gay Bullying

nobullying_logoV02End-Gay-Bullying-642x336Gay bullying is particularly difficult to address because kids are searching for their identity in adolescence. Bullying based on sexual orientation can be particularly damaging. Yet these students get bullied at a higher rate than their heterosexual peers.The types of bullying lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students suffer are varied and some types are more common:

The places in which gay bullying take place also are varied, but the bulk take place common areas:

  • 39 percent in locker rooms
  • 38.8 percent in bathrooms
  • 32.5 percent in gym class.

This type of harassment typically involves witnesses, as they are carried within school grounds. Yet witnesses do not come forward. Further student education may change that, but the situation also requires greater vigilance from teachers, coaches, administrators and support staff.

As with any type of bullying, the damage of gay bullying goes beyond emotional and spills out onto academics.

Gay bullying affects victims’ school attendance:

  • 29.8 percent reported skipping a class at least once
  • 31.8 percent missed a day of school in the past month due to safety fears

Missed days and emotional distress affects these students’ grades. Students who reported being harassed due to their sexual orientation had a lower grade point average, 2.9, than their lesser harassed peers with an average grade point average of 3.2.

The good news is that of the data that has been collected, school efforts to improve the school environment for LGBT students is having a positive outcome. The 2011 National School Climate Survey reports decreased levels of biased language and victimization. Teens surveyed also reported greater access to LGBT resources and support. The increased efforts for fighting gay bullying on behalf of school translate into a safer school environment for students. The 2011 survey had 8,584 student respondents from all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Schools around the country are working to make improvements, but much more needs to be done to end gay bullying.

  • Only 45.7 percent of LGBT students reported having a Gay-Straight Alliance at school.
  • A mere 16.8 percent learned positive representations in school about LGBT historical figures.
  • Lamentably, only 54.6 percent could identify six or more supportive educators
  • Only 7.4 percent said their school included gay bulling in their anti-bullying initiatives.

The task for the community is to push schools to do more. Students, teachers, administrators and parents can do more to help eradicate gay bullying. The actions below are a step in right direction.

  • Consider lobbying your school to implement Gay-Straight Alliances, which help bridge understanding among students, focusing tolerance. If a student cannot gain the attention of administrators, seek assistance from supportive school staff. You may want to seek support from the Equal Access Act which protects the right to form a GSA. right to form a GSA under the Equal Access Act.
  • Youth can work with student councils to include gay tolerance in their schools anti-bullying policies. If students do not want to stand out by spearheading these initiatives, an anonymous suggestion can be made or a supportive staff member can make the suggestion to the student council.
  • Parents and teachers can urge the school to schedule a discussion at an assembly or an after school activity about tolerance. Suggest a guest speaker from your community of from the media.
  • Seek support from a teacher, coach or administrator to start an organization on campus that offers students support and resources, such as the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN). Contact these groups to send educational materials and resources that can be distributed to students.
  • School administrators should consider an anonymous suggestion box, where students can feel uninhibited to make anonymous bullying reports.
  • Adults should be mindful of protecting student privacy. The youth may not want a teacher to disclose LGBT issues to their parents or vice versa.

Adults and students must be aware of their rights. While federal civil right laws to not protect harassment based on sexual orientation, the bullying may target a particular student’s non-conformity to gender norms, which then falls under sexual harassment that is covered under Title IX. Learn more about federal civil rights laws here.

Click the image and take the CyberBullying Survey
Click the image and take the CyberBullying Survey

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Vote for change: UN’s My World campaign

UNDP and JCI delegates pictured with Mr Ahmed Kathrada
UNDP and JCI delegates pictured with Mr Ahmed Kathrada
The United Nations My World initiative is a global survey that invites citizens of the planet to vote on how they would like to change the world for the better.

My World asks individuals which six out of 16 possible issues they think would make the most difference to their lives. People of all ages, genders and backgrounds are invited to vote, which will ultimately help inform world leaders as they begin drafting the next global development agenda.

The campaign was launched to local media at the Nelson Mandela Foundation on Thursday 17 July 2014.

Some 2.75-million people have already voted (see analytics here), profiling what matters most to them in their world.

“UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is committed to making the process of drafting the next global development agenda as inclusive as possible. The aim is to involve all citizens in profiling key aspirations for the future,” said Dr Agostinho Zacarias, UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident.

UNDP delegates pictured with Mr Ahmed Kathrada
UNDP delegates pictured with Mr Ahmed Kathrada
Corinne Woods, Global Director of the UN Millennium Campaign, spoke about My World as a platform that drives global engagement.

“The survey aims to listen to the voices of ordinary people and brings them to a worldwide decision-making process. It is individuals that will help define priorities for the path to 2030,” she said.

What is top priority for the world’s citizens?

According to the votes captured thus far, the world’s citizens think the following four aspects are most important:

  1. A good education
  2. Better healthcare
  3. Better job opportunities
  4. An honest and responsive government.

“In South Africa, the votes indicate that what matters most is a good education and protection against crime and violence,” said Woods.

Corinne Woods profiled My World as a platform that drives global engagement
Corinne Woods profiled My World as a platform that drives global engagement
William More and Sage Martin drive the My World outreach and research programme. They have engaged with communities in over 15 countries, walking the streets and asking people what matters most to them. They table the stories they have been told on the Humans of My World Facebook page.

“We cannot lose sight of the fact that it is the power of the human individual and the human story that changes hearts and incites people to come together and fight for change,” quoted Martin.

The president of Junior Chamber International (JCI) South Africa, Linda Ben, said the survey speaks to the heart of active citizenry.

“We need to understand that in order to effect positive change, we have to empower ourselves and our communities. Lend your voice to the UN campaign and help shape the world we live in,” she said.

Luvuyo Mandela urged young people to engage with the platforms available to co-create a world they want to live in

Luvuyo Mandela urged young people to engage with the platforms available to co-create a world they want to live in
Luvuyo Mandela urged young people to engage with the platforms available to co-create a world they want to live in
“Gone are the days for ordinary citizens to be seen and not heard – and for the youth to be seen and not heard,” said Luvuyo Mandela. “Today we have incredible resources at hand that are asking us to help shape the world of our dreams.

“It’s time for us as young people to come together and debate about what matters most to us. It’s time for us ask how we can best make ourselves heard.”

Mandela urged young people to engage with the platforms available to co-create a world they want to live in.

To find out more about the UN My World survey, please visit http://www.myworld2015.org/

To cast your vote, visit http://www.myworld2015.org/

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Adult Bully’s “The Five Types”

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I am re-blogging this post which I origanally posted Feb 21, 2013, as there are others that need re-posting as well, this being the first. “Adult Bully’s The Five Types”, the one we are dealing with 90% of the time is number one, The Narcissistic Adult Bully, please read the description below: “You may not hear a lot about adult bullying, but it is a problem. Read this article to learn more about different types of adult bullies and get some ideas on how to deal with an adult bully. Adult bullying is a serious problem and may require legal action. One would think that as people mature and progress through life, that they would stop behaviors of their youth. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Sadly, adults can be bullies, just as children and teenagers can be bullies. While adults are more likely to use verbal bullying as opposed to physical bullying, the fact of the matter is that adult bullying exists. The goal of an adult bully is to gain power over another person, and make himself or herself the dominant adult. They try to humiliate victims, and “show them who is boss.” There are several different types of adult bullies, and it helps to know how they operate:

  1. Narcissistic Adult Bully
  2. first-place

    This type of adult bully is self-centered and does not share empathy with others. Additionally, there is little anxiety about consequences. He or she seems to feel good about him or herself, but in reality has a brittle narcissism that requires putting others down.

  3. Impulsive Adult Bully:
  4. 2nd-place

    Adult bullies in this category are more spontaneous and plan their bullying out less. Even if consequences are likely, this adult bully has a hard time restraining his or her behavior. In some cases, this type of bullying may be unintentional, resulting in periods of stress, or when the bully is actually upset or concerned about something unconnected with the victim.

  5. Physical Bully:
  6. third4While adult bullying rarely turns to physical confrontation, there are, nonetheless, bullies that use physicality. In some cases, the adult bully may not actually physically harm the victim, but may use the threat of harm, or physical domination through looming. Additionally, a physical bully may damage or steal a victim’s property, rather than physically confronting the victim.

  7. Verbal Adult Bully:
  8. 4thWords can be quite damaging. Adult bullies who use this type of tactic may start rumors about the victim, or use sarcastic or demeaning language to dominate or humiliate another person. This subtle type of bullying also has the advantage – to the bully – of being difficult to document. However, the emotional and psychological impacts of verbal bullying can be felt quite keenly and can result in reduced job performance and even depression.

  9. Secondary Adult Bully:

2pm153-hr904-2This is someone who does not initiate the bullying, but joins in so that he or she does not actually become a victim down the road. Secondary bullies may feel bad about what they are doing, but are more concerned about protecting themselves. (Definitions courtesy of Bullying Statistics http://www.bullyingstatistics.org/)

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